Pupil Premium Allocation

The Pupil Premium was introduced by the government in April 2011 to provide funding to support the raising of achievement for disadvantaged students based upon the following criteria:

  • children from low income families who are eligible for free school meals (FSM)
  • looked after children in care for at least a continuous period of 6 months (LAC)
  • students from families whose parents serve in the Armed Forces.

‘Ofsted’ conducted a survey of the impact of the Pupil Premium and published a report in September 2012. This report outlined a national variance in the use of the Pupil Premium. Overall, the report pointed to the fact that there was little evidence of a strong focus upon the Pupil Premium and since then, the government has since recommended separate monitoring as well as reporting requirements for this, with information being freely available to Governors and inspectors with information published on the College website.

Pupil Premium Funding

Pupil Premium funding is received on a financial year basis rather than per academic year.

The organised level of Pupil Premium funding at its inception in April 2011 was £480 per student, this funding has been increased by Central Government in each of the following financial years to £623 per student in April 2012 with the current level of funding of £935 per student.

At Marsden Heights Community College in 2014/15 there were 327 students eligible for the deprivation pupil premium, creating actual revenue of £319,255. This level of funding has been derived from the number of pupils eligible based upon the Autumn 2014 census and Free School Meal (FSM) history on all School Censuses since 2007, known as ‘Ever 6’.

The pupil premium resources have been allocated to support the identified cohorts to accelerate their levels of achievement. The funding was also used to support other interventions beyond the curriculum in an attempt to remove all barriers to progress.

We have planned our deployment of the Pupil Premium funding to ensure that all staff are fully aware that we have:

  • made all reasonable efforts to ensure the money is spent on the target groups.
  • thoroughly analysed which pupils were underachieving, particularly in English and Mathematics and identifying why they were underachieving.
  • used achievement data frequently to check whether interventions or techniques were working and made adjustments accordingly through our individual pupil tracking data.
  • Never confused eligibility for the Pupil Premium with low ability and we have focused on supporting disadvantaged pupils to achieve the highest levels.
  • Kept governors informed as regards the performance and outcomes of this spending.

School performance tables now include an indicator to show the attainment of PP students within the stated categories who are collectively identified through a ‘disadvantage ‘measure devised by the DfE

Since September 2012 all schools have had to publish key online information which details:

  • The amount of Pupil Premium funding the College will receive during the current academic year
  • Details of planned allocation and spend of the Pupil Premium
  • Details of how the Pupil Premium was spent during the most recent academic year
  • The impact of the spending of the Pupil Premium in terms of its overall effects upon disadvantaged students…we have to demonstrate that a difference has been made in closing the attainment and progress gaps which may exist

The key is to be able to demonstrate that PP students have:

  • Increased their functional understanding in literacy as well as in numeracy
  • Have attained as well as made progress in English Language and Maths
  • Produced overall outcomes in line with the rest of their year cohort

‘Ofsted’ will examine:

  • Students who make progress relative to their starting points
  • The progress that has been made since joining the College
  • Progress of SEN students within and outside of the PP category
  • How well students are prepared for their next stage of education (entry requirements etc)
  • How well gaps between different pupil categories are being narrowed

Breakdown of College population into year groups

2015-16
Year Group Total Number of Students Number of Pupil Premium Students % Pupil Premium Students
7 182 59 31
8 170 65 38
9 175 62 35
10 203 69 34
11 174 60 34
ALL 904 315 35

Analysis of Pupil Premium Students Attainment and Progress

Outcomes for 2014-15
What impact has Pupil Premium spending had upon students who are within this cohort? Information of impact upon the learning and progress of Pupil Premium has been collated in ‘RAISE’ on-line. This is a document used by schools and ‘Ofsted’ inspectors to examine school performance.

The following tables compare the attainment and progress of Pupil Premium students and non Pupil Premium students during 2014-15. They also compare the last three years to track any improvements made.

2015-16 English %3 Levels Progress Mathematics %3 levels progress %5A* – C including English and Mathematics Progress 8
Marsden Heights National average 2015 Marsden Heights National average 2015 Marsden Heights National average 2015
Pupil Premium 50 57 29 49 25 36 -0.4
Non Pupil Premium 72 74 48 72 35 63 0.05
GAP -22% -17% -19% -23% -10% -27% -0.35

Our gaps between Pupil Premium students and Non Pupil Premium students achievements have in the main been decreasing since 2013.

2012-15 THREE YEARS COMPARISON
Year %3 Levels Progress English %3 Levels Progress Mathematics % 5A* – C English and Maths
2013/14College Gap -5 -21 -6
2014/15 College Gap +16 -3 +1
2015/16 College Gap -22 -19 -10

Over the last three years the gap between Pupil Premium and Non Pupil Premium has changed considerably both in attainment and progress, last year the Pupil Premium students performed better than their peers at Marsden Heights. This year a bigger gap than usual is apparent. We are regularly looking at ways to raise the attainment and progress of all students so that they are closer to national averages, this is despite having a much lower attainment profile on entry at key stage 2 than most schools within the country.

Pupil Premium Funding in 2015-16

The Pupil Premium is additional funding given to schools so that they can support their disadvantaged students and close the attainment gap between them and their peers.

The total number of students entitled to Ever 6 free school meals and therefore eligible for Pupil Premium funding in 2015/16, is 326; the number of students recorded under Order or Residence Order and eligible for Pupil Premium Plus funding, is 3.

Based on funding of £935 and £1,900 respectively per student, we have received an indicative total allocation for the year of £310,510.

Funding is planned in a variety of ways using different weightings of 40% or 80% of costs (40% being the percentage of students eligible for Pupil Premium of the total number of students on roll ) i.e.

Area of Spending Amount Impact of Spending
Staffing costs for 1 x Personalised Learning & Behaviour Support Leader to support students across all years in Reflection & Seclusion 10,023 This process dramatically cut the number of fixed term exclusions given across the college from 17.8% 2012/13  to 4.4% in 2015/16. There is still an in college gap between disadvantaged students and none disadvantaged students that will focused on over the next academic year.
Staffing costs for Youth and Community Workers to develop extra-curricular enrichment activities for students both in and out of college 36,519 Worked successfully with pupil premium students across all year groups. Provided many extra- curricular opportunities such as Summer schools, intervention work and residential. Provided year 7 students with an introduction to outdoor education via Forest School.
Continued employment of additional teaching staff to support teaching and learning for all students and reduce adult:student ratio 84,063 Improved results in GCSE English
Consistent, well qualified teaching staff
Engaging teaching strategies used
Smaller groups to allow personalised learning
Some teachers used to team teach or used to run intervention sessions or support groups.
Employment of 2 x additional TA2 support to deliver personalised intervention programmes 24,000 Provided in class support for students to help to break down barriers to learning. Delivered small group intervention when needed to aid access to a differentiated curriculum.  Working mainly with disadvantaged students with SEN, this lead to this group doing slightly better than the none SEN pupil premium students at the end of year 11.
Employment of TA3 support to deliver personalised intervention programmes 52,481 Provided in class support for students to help to break down barriers to learning. Delivered small group intervention when needed to aid access to a differentiated curriculum. Working mainly with disadvantaged students with SEN, this lead to this group doing slightly better than the none SEN pupil premium students at the end of year 11.
Employment of Engagement Mentor to support vulnerable children and families 16,409 Impact was affected due to staff illness/ absence over the academic year. Worked hard to create links between college and the most hard to reach families. Improved the attendance and attitude of the students who were targeted.
Employment of 1 x full-time Librarian to support student learning 6,677 Enabled students to access the Lexia programme before the start of the school day to boost significantly literacy skills of the lowest ability students, as well as facilitating the Accelerated Reader programme that runs across the whole of KS3. The LRC is used as a drop in centre for homework as well as providing access to ICT and printing facilities.
Employment of Attendance Assistant to support student attendance 6,354 Targeted disadvantaged students for first day response but did not close the attendance gap that opened between disadvantaged and none disadvantaged students.
Employment of full time Attendance Manager to support student attendance 10,306 This role was vacated early in the year and was not replaced. This role will be done by none teaching heads of year in future.
Employment of 3 x TA3 (Inclusion) to support students in planning and delivery of intervention programmes 52,481 Worked successfully with vulnerable disadvantaged students, delivering one to one support. Building self-esteem, confidence and dealing with health issues. Students developed positive relationships and engaged in the process, this has lead in some cases to significant academic progress.
Funding for intervention programmes 10,000 This money was spent on a number of interventions including extracurricular visits for year 7. The purchase of ICT equipment for disadvantaged students to use at home. Out of college tutoring. Equipment and college uniform. The money was also used to support intervention programmes, paying for transport, catering and resources.
Resources 5,000 Used to purchase uniform, ICT equipment and other resources to remove barriers to learning for disadvantaged students.
Incentive rewards scheme 1,000 This money was spent on various rewards that were used to support behaviour for learning; money also funded an attendance award.
Contribution to educational visits focused on enrichment 500 Enabled all students in Year 8 to attend a science visit as part of Science Week.
TOTAL 315,812

Disadvantaged Funding in 2016-17

The Pupil Premium Grant is additional funding given to schools so that they can support their disadvantaged students and close the attainment gap between them and their peers.
The total number of students entitled to Ever 6 free school meals and therefore eligible for Pupil Premium Grant funding in 2016/17, is 311; the number of students recorded under Order or Child Arrangements Order and eligible for Pupil Premium Plus funding, is 2 . Based on funding of £935 and £1,900 respectively per student, we have received an indicative total allocation for the year of £294,585.
Funding is planned in a variety of ways using different weightings of 40% or 80% of costs (40% being the percentage of students eligible for Pupil Premium of the total number of students on roll)
Area of Spending Amount Outline Actions
Staffing costs of 2 x TA2 support to deliver personalised intervention programmes 12,355 To work one to one or in small groups to provide intervention packages that aim to overcome educational barriers amongst disadvantaged students.
Staffing costs of 5 x non-teaching Head of Year posts as pastoral support, tracking, monitoring and intervention 128,829 To provide pastoral care to all students with a focus on the needs of disadvantaged students. To work with students and families to provide a smooth access to education. To track and monitor the progress of students and put intervention packages in place. Work towards narrowing the attendance gap between disadvantaged and none disadvantaged students.
Staffing costs of Engagement Mentor to support vulnerable children and families 17,423 To work closely with students and families of vulnerable. Mentoring students and developing social skills.
Staffing costs of 1 x full-time Librarian to support student learning 8,494 To facilitate the accelerated reading programme that covers the whole of key stage 3. To work with disadvantaged students using the Lexia programme.
Staffing costs of Attendance Officer to support student attendance 7,220 To focus on disadvantaged students in first day response. To work towards narrowing the gap between disadvantaged and none disadvantaged students. To convene attendance panel meetings when appropriate.
Staffing costs of 3 x TA3 (Inclusion) to support students in planning and delivery of intervention programmes 63,270 To work with the most vulnerable disadvantaged students, planning and delivering one to one and small group intervention. Where necessary will also work alongside outside agencies to break down barriers to learning. To engage with and provide intervention to students who have been put into restoration. The team will track and monitor the progress of each of the students they work with.
Funding for intervention programmes 10,000 To be allocated over the course of the academic year.
Incentive rewards scheme 1,000 To be allocated over the course of the academic year.
Contribution to educational visits focused on enrichment 500 To support a science department visit to the zoo.
TOTAL 297,517
Contribution to costs for Leading Practitioner – Maths (from Sep) 14,000
Employment of 2 x Literacy & Numeracy TA2 to develop reading, writing and mathematical skills 33,000
Purchase of tablets for student use 15,000
Purchase of ICT numeracy programme 8000
Purchase of Lexia UK programme 4,200
TOTAL 74,200