MATHEMATICS

The mathematics curriculum aims to enthuse and equip students with the knowledge and skills to solve problems, both in mathematics and other subjects. Throughout years 7 to 11 students develop fluency in the fundamental knowledge and processes of mathematics, aiming to increase conceptual understanding. Students learn to reason mathematically and solve problems in a variety of contexts in preparation for the 9-1 GCSE.

Details of changes in the National Curriculum can be found here.

Reasoning Mathematically

Throughout college students develop their mathematical reasoning by making connections between different areas of mathematics. They will use their knowledge to begin to infer results and create clear reasoned arguments given in standard mathematical formulation.

Subject Content

For the purposes of the National Curriculum, subject content has been broken down into six broad areas, however, students are encouraged to draw links between all these areas and regard them as one coherent whole. In each year students will build upon the work covered in these areas in the previous year or key stage.

Year 7

  • Number: this includes formal methods of calculation as well as an understanding of the number system. There is an emphasis on fractions.
  • Algebra: students learn the fundamentals of the language of algebra, including simplifying expressions , using basic formulae and simple equations.
  • Ratio and proportion(including rates of change): using proportion and ratio to compare quantities
  • Geometry and measures: including properties of shapes, coordinates and area and volume of simple shapes.
  • Probability: using the probability scale to describe and measure chance, and calculating simple probabilities
  • Statistics: students construct and interpret graphs and charts, compare and contrast different data sets and draw conclusions using simple statistical measures.

Year8

  • Number: this includes formal methods of calculation as well as an understanding of the number system. This includes further development of the use of percentage and multipliers.
  • Algebra: students learn the language of algebra and the ability to interpret problems in algebraic symbolism. Students begin to solve more complex equations and work with algebraic expressions in a range of wider contexts.
  • Ratio and proportion(including rates of change): this includes practical applications such as speed calculations and percentage change.
  • Geometry and measures: including   properties of shapes, the use of angle properties , standard notation and area of plane shapes.
  • Probability: students work with and understand the differences between theoretical and experimental probability using the probability scale fluently.
  • Statistics: students construct and interpret graphs and charts, compare and contrast different data sets and draw conclusions.

Year 9

  • Number: this includes formal methods of calculation as well as an understanding of the number system. Students work with other representations such as standard form.
  • Algebra: students learn the language of algebra and the ability to interpret problems in algebraic symbolism. Students will begin to use algebra more fluently and further develop their skills in preparation for KS4.
  • Ratio and proportion(including rates of change): this includes practical applications such as speed calculations, percentage change and similar shapes.
  • Geometry and measures: including   properties of shapes, the use of angle properties to begin to construct simple proofs.
  • Probability; students work with and understand the differences between theoretical and experimental probability using the probability scale fluently. Alternative was of listing outcomes and determining probabilities are studied.
  • Statistics: students construct and interpret graphs and charts, compare and contrast different data sets and draw conclusions.

 

Years 10 and 11

Students continue to develop their skills and knowledge in the six areas . Curriculum content is increasingly differentiated to prepare students for either the higher or foundation tier papers at GCSE. Newly introduced topics include the following.

Topics new to Foundation tier (previously Higher tier only in 2010)

  • Index laws: zero and negative powers (numeric and algebraic)
  • Standard form • Compound interest and reverse percentages
  • Direct and indirect proportion (numeric and algebraic)
  • Expand the product of two linear expressions
  • Factorise quadratic expressions in the form x2 + bx + c
  • Solve linear/linear simultaneous equations
  • Solve quadratic equations by factorisation
  • Plot cubic and reciprocal graphs, recognise quadratic and cubic graphs
  • Trigonometric ratios in 2D right-angled triangles
  • Fractional scale enlargements in transformations
  • Lengths of arcs and areas of sectors of circles
  • Mensuration problems
  • Vectors (except geometric problems/proofs)
  • Density
  • Tree diagrams

Topics new to both tiers

  • Use inequality notation to specify simple error intervals
  • Identify and interpret roots, intercepts, turning points of quadratic functions graphically; deduce roots algebraically
  • Fibonacci type sequences, quadratic sequences, geometric progressions
  • Relate ratios to linear functions
  • Interpret the gradient of a straight line graph as a rate of change
  • Know the exact values of sin θ and cos θ for θ = 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90°; know the exact value of tan θ for θ = 0°, 30°, 45° and 60°

Assessment

Students are assessed against key objectives within their classwork and homework . This is done with end of unit tests and homework booklets. Formal written assessments are set each term and at the end of each year. All formal assessments make use of GCSE style questions and problems.

GCSE assessment

100% examination.

Students study for one of two tiers, higher (grades 9-5) and foundation (grades 5-1). Assessment is by three 1 ½ hour examinations. The first paper is non calculator, in papers 2 and 3 a calculator is required.