ICT

Programmes of study for students in Computing

A skills based curriculum with a range of tasks across each academic year will build skills progression. Each academic year students will develop and build key skills in computer science, digital literacy and programming, moving towards independent study. Units of work are structured to enable differentiation for students across the age and ability range in years 7-11

Year 7 & 8X

Students will build skills in the varied areas of the new curriculum throughout the 2 years, preparing them to take the different disciplines further;

Through the study of:

Term 1

How to use computers safely and responsibly; file management, eSafety, setting up online profiles, eMail, using the internet to effectively and efficiently search for information and learning about Boolean logic.

Computing History & what’s under the hood; students will investigate and present information about the components that make up a computer, software packages and uses, input and output devices, Alan Turing and Tim Berners-Lee, the 5 generations of computers and will eventually learn evaluation techniques at the end of the project.

Term 2

Control Systems – Students will learn about flowcharts, sequencing, sensors and subroutines, actuators and variables.

Introducing coding with Kodu investigating how programmes work, creating landscapes, navigation and pathing, clones v creatables, pages and selection and game depth and complexity.

Image manipulation using Photoshop.

Term 3

First steps in Small Basic – introducing the turtle, using loops and the text window, using variables, conditions and branching, and using random numbers.

App Design in AppShed – plan and implement individual projects using skills built throughout the year.

Year 8M & 9

Students will develop and consolidate skills in the 3 areas of the new curriculum;

Through the study of:

Term 1

Understanding computers – investigating the elements of a computer system and the CPU, understanding binary and learning how to complete addition in binary, the different storage devices and convergence and new technologies.

Your digital world; students will investigate and present information about how to protect their online identity, digital rights and responsibilities, the network of the internet, technological protocols, and networks and will eventually develop evaluation techniques learned earlier at the end of the project.

Flash animations.

Term 2

Control Systems – Students will develop their understanding about flowcharts, sequencing, sensors and subroutines, actuators and variables.

Games programming in Scratch – designing and creating a game using movement, lives and scoring, randomising the behaviour of sprites, shooting and jumping, adding sounds and testing their work.

Term 3

Introduction to Python – students will learn a text based programming language using numbers and arithmetic, selection, writing algorithms, while loops and searching. They will do this using the Code Academy website.

App Design in AppShed – plan and implement individual projects using skills built throughout the year.

Computing department Key Stage 3 Curriculum map

Rationale:

The demands of the new National Curriculum for first teaching September 2014 requires coverage of:

  • Digital Literacy – this is the ability to effectively, responsibly, safely and critically navigate, evaluate and create digital artefacts using a range of digital technologies.
  • Computer Science – is the scientific and practical study of computation: what can be computed, how to compute it, and how computation may be applied to the solution of problems.
  • Information Technology – is concerned with how computers and telecommunications equipment work, and how they may be applied to the storage, retrieval, transmission and manipulation of data.

Assessment

Students will carry out tasks on a number of topics throughout KS3 covering the areas above:

Digital Literacy

Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns.

Computer Science

Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real world problems and physical systems.

Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking, use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem.

Use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures, design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions.

Understand simple Boolean logic and some of its uses in circuits and programming; understand how numbers cab be represented in binary, and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers.

Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems.

Understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system; understand how data of various types can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits.

Information technology

Undertake creative projects that involve selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices, to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users.

Create, re-use, revise and re-purpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability.

Rationale for Key Stage 3 : Checklist for NC 2014 planning

Aims

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all students:

  • Can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation.
  • Can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems.
  • Can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems.
  • Are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

Key stage 3

  • design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems
  • understand several key algorithms that reflect computational; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem
  • use 2 or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures
  • design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions
  • understand simple Boolean and some of its uses in circuits and programming; understand how numbers can be represented in binary, and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers
  • understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems
  • understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system; understand how data of various types (including text, sounds and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits
  • undertake creative projects that involve selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices, to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users
  • create, reuse, revise and repurpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability
  • understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct, and know how to report concerns

One formal assessment per term assessing the students understanding of the key concepts covered.

All tasks will build on skills progression. Tasks will be differentiated to ensure all students can make progress from their starting points.